Silly Questions to Ask Children

I have been working on a project designed to measure a certain individual difference in children as early as 5 years of age. There are a number of concerns about the use of self-reports with young children so this has been an overarching concern in this project. To partially address this issue, we came up with a handful of items that would be useful for detecting unusual responses in children. These items might be used to identify children who did not understand how to use the response scale or flag children who were giving responses that would be considered invalid.  There is a cottage industry of these kinds of scales for adult personality inventories but fewer options for kids.  (And yes I know about those controversies in the literature over these kinds of scales.)

Truth be told, I like writing items and I think this is true for many researchers. I am curious about how people respond to all sorts of questions especially silly ones.  It is even better if the silly ones tap something interesting about personality or ask participants about dinosaurs.

Here are a few sample items:

1. How do you feel about getting shots from the doctor?

2. How do you feel about getting presents for your birthday?

And my favorite item ever….

3. How would you feel about being eaten by a T-Rex?

The fact that we have asked over 800 kids this last question is sort of ridiculous but it makes me happy. I predicted that kids should report negative responses for this one. This was true for the most part but 11.3% of the sample registered a positive response. In fact, the T-Rex item sparked a heated conversation in my household this morning. My spouse (AD) is a former school teacher and AD thought some kids might think it was cool to see a T-Rex. She thought it was a bad item. My youngest child (SD) thought it would be bad to be eaten by said T-Rex even if it was cool to see one in person. I think SD was on my side.

I have had enough controversy over the past few weeks so I wanted to move on from this breakfast conversation. Thus, I did what any sensible academic would do – I equivocated. I acknowledged that items usually reflect multiple sources of variance and all have some degree of error. I also conceded that this item might pick up on sensation seeking tendencies. There could be some kids who might find it thrilling to be eaten by a T-Rex.Then I took SD to school and cried over a large cup of coffee.

But I still like this item and I think most people would think it would suck to be eaten by a T-Rex. It might also be fun to crowd source the writing of additional items. Feel free to make suggestions.

PS: I want to acknowledge my two collaborators on this project – Michelle Harris and Kali Trzesniewski. They did all of the hard work collecting these data.

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